Team "Streinth": Stress Response & Innovative Therapies

The “Streinth” laboratory develops a dynamic translational research on cancer through an interactive group of scientists and clinicians affiliated to INSERM, Paul Strauss Cancer Center, and Strasbourg University Hospitals. We aims at the development of more efficient and personalised therapies through a better understanding of the variability in the therapeutic response and via the development of innovative molecules, including facilitators of immunotherapy protocols. A particular focus is made on the role of the family of the p53 tumor suppressor gene and epigenetic processes in the dynamic interactions between cancer cells and the tumour ecosystem - metabolic and cellular microenvironment and impacted healthy tissues (muscle, nervous system). To address these questions, we propose a translational research that includes fundamental molecular studies extending them into the pathophysiological context using animal models and clinical investigations (i.e. biobanks for gastric and head/neck cancers). Our results are often the bases for the development of innovative mono or combined therapies targeting the cellular metabolism, which already led to several patents. We believe that our projects will uncover innovative tolls for treatment decision making and therapeutic protocols that will be translated from bench to bed in the frame of clinical trials.

The tumor ecosystem

The tumor ecosystem includes the cancer cells, their metabolic microenvironment (hypoxia, pH...), cellular microenvironment (immune cells, fibroblasts, neuronal extremities...), and the distant healthy tissues that interact with the tumor (muscle, nervous system...).

The p53 family

A complex family of transcription factor homologous to the tumor suppressor gene p53. Three genes with multiple isoforms exists: p53, p63 and p73. This family is often altered in cancers.

Targeted cancers

We focus on particularly agressive cancers that have still a poor survival rate: gastric and head and neck cancers. For instance, gastric cancer patients have an 11 month median survival.

Team activities

In progress

Develop innovative therapies and identify predictive markers

Develop innovative therapies and identify predictive markers

by integrating the complexity of the tumoral ecosystem

In the recents years, important findings highlighted that cancer cells are part of a complex ecosystem that influence greatly the efficacy of the therapies at multiple levels. This ecosystem provides support for the cancer cells to allow their survival, and in return, the cancer cells influence the surrounding or more distant healthy tissues. This ecosystem includes:

  • Microenvironment:
    • Metabolic (hypoxia, low pH, lactate, ROS...)
    • Cellular (activated fibroblasts, immune cells, neutrons...)
  • Healthy tissus that are impacted by the tumor or the treatment:
    • Muscle atrophy that causes 20% of cancer death
    • Nervous system

Our Team

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Johnathan Doe

Johnathan Doe

The Mastermind

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Lisa Brown

Lisa Brown

Creative head

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Mike Collins

Mike Collins

Technical lead

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Recent From Blog

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